Tag Archives: Town

Desert Roll

Lego Monocycle

We don’t understand steampunk at the best of times, so we’re really lost here. No matter though, because this ‘Wasteland Monocycle’ by Flickr’s Daniel Church is achingly cool. And that’s before you see it working. Yup, this sort-of-but-not-quite-Victorian-oddity is motorised, allowing it to roll across an endless desert for eternity. Click the links to see how!

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Stranger Blazer

Lego Chevrolet Blazer K5 Stranger Things

Here in TLCB’s home nation police cars all look pretty much the same, so a coffee-coloured police car really would be a strange sight. Not so in the Unites States though, where police livery varies widely from state to state. That makes this 1980 Chevrolet Blazer K5 police car not strange at all, but it is a starring vehicle in the TV show ‘Stranger Things’, being driven by Police Chief Jim Hopper, and that can be very strange indeed.

This ‘Stranger Things’ Chevrolet Blazer was suggested to us by a reader and comes from TLCB Master MOCer Andrea Lattanzio aka Norton74, who has recreated both it and Hopper’s cabin beautifully in Lego form. Click here to head over to Andrea’s photostream for all the strange goings on.

Lego Chevrolet Blazer K5 Stranger Things

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Light Artillery

Lego SPA TL17

This is an SPA TL.37, a light artillery tractor built by a subsidiary of Fiat during the Second World War for Royal Italian Army. Powered by a huge 4-litre 4-cylinder engine, with four wheel drive and four wheel steering, able to climb a 40-degree slope, and capable of 40km/h whilst pulling 75 or 100mm artillery pieces, it looks like a seriously fun vehicle for gadding about in the desert. Unfortunately for the Axis Powers their gadding about in the desert did not go well, but that’s not exactly the fault of SPA TL.37. There’s more to see of this one courtesy of Rebla of Flickr – click here to take a look.

Lego SPA TL.37

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Flying the Eastern Front

Lego Vintage Aircraft

This delightful scene of calm in the midst of a Great War era conflict comes from Tino Poutianen of Flickr, who has created a lovely generic Allied fighter with its two dashing crew casually catching up on news from home whilst a pig steals some lunch.

Sadly we doubt they or the pig will be around this time next year. The early years of wartime flight were terrifically dangerous, and pigs are, well… really tasty. For now all is well though, and happily it’s this scene that’s been preserved in brick by Tino. See more at the link.

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Meet the Fokkers

Lego Fokker D.VII

Once the largest aircraft manufacturer in the world, Fokker are now perhaps best known for supplying the German Army during the first World War. The company wasn’t actually German though, instead being founded by Dutchman Anthony Fokker in 1912 whilst he studied in Germany, before moving back to the Netherlands in 1919.

The company that once supplied Germany then fought against them in World War 2, before the Germans invaded the Netherlands and requisitioned Fokker’s factories.

The bombing by the Allies that followed completely destroyed Fokker’s manufacturing facilities, and with a glut of cheap ‘lightly used’ aircraft available at the end of the war the company barely survived. But survive it did, right up until 1996 when the might of Boeing and Airbus finally put an end to Fokker aircraft production.

These two wonderful models depict Fokker in their glory days, when they designed arguably the best fighter aircraft in the world for the German Army during the First World War (and we won’t begrudge them that as the First World War was, as previously explained here, completely pointless).

Built by Dread Pirate Wesley they are a Fokker D.VII and Fokker Eindecker E.IV, both recreated (and photographed) beautifully in mini-figure scale. There’s more to see of each aircraft (plus many more) at Wesley’s brilliant ‘Lego Aircraft’ Flickr album – click the link to take off.

Lego Fokker Eindecker

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Got Milk?

Lego Milk Float

Slow, quiet, and arriving in the dead of night, the humble electric milk float would be a spooky vehicle if it weren’t for the fact that it’s, well… a milk float.

Now sadly mostly replaced by boring (and not quiet at all) diesel vans, surely the time is right for the electric milk float to make a comeback. Stick a Tesla badge on it and the internet would love it at any rate.

This glorious homage to the silent dairy delivery knights comes from Flickr’s de-marco and there’s more to see of his brilliant milk float (and instructions too) at his photostream. Click the link above to bring the bottles in.

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The Greatest Showman

Lego Traction Engine

Before the internal combustion engine took over as the dominant technology, early vehicles were powered by all sorts of stuff. Electric – weirdly – was widely used (so things are coming full circle and perhaps Tesla aren’t that revolutionary after all), as was steam, which featured in everything from small(ish) runabouts to enormous tractors, or ‘traction engines’.

Unlike electric, steam vehicles probably aren’t going to make a comeback, but we do still like to see a nice traction engine. Yeah, we’re a bit sad. So does Flickr’s Nikolaus Lowe though, and as such he’s built this splendid mini-figure scale ‘Showman’s Engine’, completely with a wonderfully be-hatted showman at the controls. Head to Nikolaus’s photostream via the link above for more details.

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Dangerous Erection

Lego MAZ, RSD-10 Pioneer SS-20 Saber

This website has featured a few tenuously linked erection puns over the years, but today there’s no tenuousness at all, as this green phallus-on-wheels is actually called an ‘erector-launcher’.

This Cold War era Soviet RSD-10 ‘Pioneer’ ballistic nuclear missile and the amazing MAZ 547 transporter erector-launcher which carried it come from TLCB regular Ralph Savelsberg, and they’re terrifying.

Measuring over 54ft in length, weighing 37 tons, and capable of flying 7,500km whilst carrying up to three warheads by the end of its development, the RSD-10 was at the very forefront of pointless nuclear dick-waving.

Over 650 of the things were produced, but are now thankfully destroyed (bar a few decommissioned for display purposes) after the U.S and the Soviet Union signed an agreement in 1987 to stop being total morons*.

The Soviet Union though, being a model of responsibility, sold a few of the launchers to North Korea, because they’re trustworthy and accountable state nation. Sigh.

There’s more to see of this rather brilliant mini-figure scale recreation of the MAZ 547 and RSD-10 at Ralph’s Flickr album via the link above, and if you fancy seeing a real one you can do so at the Ukraine Air Force Museum in Kiev and at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C.

Or on the streets of Pyongyang in North Korea of course.

Lego MAZ, RSD-10 Pioneer SS-20 Saber*And if you think the U.S is any better, guess who this year pulled out of the agreement that ended the RSD-10 Pioneer’s use… Yeah, this guy.

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Tiny Tumbler

Lego Batman Tumbler

Still the pinnacle of the Batman franchise, Christopher Nolan’s ‘Dark Knight’ trilogy created easily the best Batmobile in the Caped Crusader’s history (we don’t even recognise ‘Batman V Superman’ as a legitimate movie here in TLCB office). Recreated many times in LEGO form the Tumbler is a favourite among Technic builders. Flickr’s _Tiler though, has built one rather smaller, and it’s magnificent.

Beautifully photographed (and enhanced with non-LEGO tyres at the front and a custom Batman), _Tiler’s Tumbler is probably the coolest mini-figure vehicle we’ve ever seen, and if you you agree you can see more at his photostream via the link above.

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Right Said Fred

Lego Ford Model T Pick-Up

“Right” said Fred, “Both of us together,
One each end and steady as we go.”
Tried to shift it, couldn’t even lift it
We was getting nowhere
And so we had a cuppa tea

“Right” said Fred, “Give a shout for Charlie.”
Up comes Charlie from the floor below.
After strainin’, heavin’ and complainin’
We was getting nowhere
And so we had a cuppa tea.

“All right” said Fred, “Have to take the feet off
To get them feet off wouldn’t take a mo.”
Took its feet off, even took the seat off
Should have got us somewhere but no!
So Fred said, “Let’s have another cuppa tea.”
And we said, “right-o”.

The mini-figures in Pixel Junkie‘s picture look like they’re about to feature in a classic comedy song, and that’s never going to end well. Still, their Ford Model T pick-up truck looks rather lovely and at least we’ve managed not to mistakenly reference the other Right Said Fred.

Dammit.

See more at the link.

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Purple Wrangler

Lego Jeep Wrangler

Some cars look good in any colour. The Jeep Wranger is not one of them. But it does look good in purple, as proved here by Eric Badis of Flickr. Click the link above to make the jump.

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Fighting Fires in Flight

Lego Sky-Fi Firefly Ship

The Skytanic has floundered. After departing the Maersk Pier some weeks ago the great skyliner reached the treacherous Northern Floating Icefield and the welcoming navigation lights of Trusty Rusty. Only Trusty Rusty’s lights weren’t showing.

Unable to see the floating icebergs the Skytanic stood little chance, and the huge ship – now engulfed in flames – is doomed. With the evacuation underway the passengers and crew are hoping for a miracle, a miracle which which may arrive in the shape of the FRSS ‘Firefly’.

Lego Sky-Fi Airship

A mighty ‘Dipteria Class’ airship, the Firefly can stay airborne for a month at a time, travelling at up to 60 knots thanks to two massive ‘Brickerton’ engines powering a pair of enormous platinum-coated six-blade rotors. With a capacity of 400,000 litres of water, plus nine water cannons, sucking moisture-rich air out of the clouds and firing it up to 250 metres, the Firefly is the Skytanic’s only hope.

Only Markus Ronge knows if the Firefly will arrive in time. Until then you can check out his amazing Sky-Fi airship by clicking here, and you can catch up on the complete ‘Netbrix’ original story ‘Full Steam’ at Markus’ Flickr photostream here.

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Gears and Garbage

Lego Town Garbage Truck

This neat garbage truck (or ‘bin lorry’ where we’re from) proves that you don’t need zillions of bricks to appear here at The Lego Car Blog. It’s got more squeezed inside it than you might think too (insert your own ‘Your Mom’ joke), as builder Scott Hasse has designed ingenious hand-operated bin lift, compactor, and dumping mechanisms, each of which works beautifully! There’s lots more to see of Scott’s mini-figure garbage truck at his photostream by clicking here, where you can also find a link to the design on the LEGO Ideas platform from which you can vote for it to become an official LEGO set.

Lego Town Garbage Truck

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Moon City

Lego Steampunk City

We do not understand steampunk. Effectively what sci-fi would look like if it were devised in the late 1800s, it’s a genre so alien to TLCB staff it may as well be the plot of ‘Keeping Up with the Kardashians’. The creations that steampunk produces however, are not like the Kardashians at all. They’re wonderful.

Lego Steampunk City

This is one such build, the Moon City originating from the mind of Dwarlin Forkbeard, which is filled with such gorgeous detail that we want to move straight there and get a job mining cheese. Complete with a marvellous motorised train (although the journey does look a bit samey), working elevators, and a rotating orrery, Dwalin’s city is packed with ingenious movement too. Click on these words to head to the moon sometime in the 1880s…

Lego Steampunk City

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Fly Bavaria

Lego Douglas DC-3

It’s a grey January winter’s day here at TLCB Towers, and we’re already pondering sunnier climes. So too is Vaionaut of Flickr it seems, having built this wonderful Douglas DC-3 airliner. Launched in the 1930s the American Douglas DC-3 revolutionised air travel, becoming the default airliner for decades thereafter, and is – incredibly – still in use today. Vaionaut’s beautifully built model is pictured here in German Bavaia livery (complete with a neat 1972 Munich olympics decal) and there’s more to see of his gorgeous creation at his photostream. Click the link above to take to the skies.

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