Money Monday

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron RC

The Lego Car Blog is not a money-focussed organisation. We only allow limited advertising, the proceeds of which you can read about here, and the staff all work for nowt (human), or Smarties (elf). However, we are still amongst the richest people on earth, thanks entirely to the place of our birth. And if you’re reading this, you probably are too.

But there’s rich, and then there’s rich! Today’s car certainly belongs to the latter. Costing $2,700,000 in base specification, the Chiron is the world’s fastest (when tested) and most powerful production car, expected to hit around 285mph when de-limited.

We’ll have to wait to see what top speed the Chiron achieves once testing is complete, as the car (and more importantly, the tyres) are in the realms of experimental physics, but even with the car’s main purpose – top speed – being an unknown statistic, it hasn’t stopped 200 Chiron orders being placed before anyone has driven it.

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron RC

Like we said, there’s rich, then there’s rich! In fact the average Chiron customer already owns over fifty other cars. And a helicopter.

We’ll stick with this one then, built by previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron it’s the first Technic Supercar sized Bugatti Chiron we’ve seen, and it is absolutely spectacular. With Bugatti’s trademark W16 engine hooked up to an all-wheel-drive system, independent suspension, full remote control drive, steering and electronically deployable rear wing, LED lighting, and SBrick bluetooth control, Lachlan’s Chiron is one of the finest Technic Supercars of the year.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Lachlan’s Bugatti at his Flickr photostream or via Eurobricks, including WIP shots and images of the rolling-chassis mechanics. Click the links above to make the jump, and you can see the Chiron in action via the video below.

YouTube Video:

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Three Wheels on My Wagon

Gene 3S’s 1966 Mini Cooper S has run into a problem on its way to Monte Carlo. Fortunately the car is well equipped with tools and a spare wheel on the roof. There are some nice details on this conventional, studs up car, plus the neat simply styled scene. The car is based on an actual Mk.1 Cooper S, LBL 6 D. The car is currently up for sale and you can see loads of photos by following this link, which is a great resource for building your own Mini Cooper or modifying LEGO’s official 10242 set.

Sadly Gene 3S’s model was TWOKed by a team of TLCB Elves just after the spare wheel was put on.  Apparently they were muttering something about stealing a gold shipment

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Pedal Power

Lego Bicycle

We seem to have a self-propelled theme running today, despite this supposedly being a car blog. Although today’s posts are self-propelled we, er… haven’t been, seeing as we pinched this creation from The Brothers Brick who beat us to it. It’s the work of Melan-E of Flickr, it’s beautiful, and you can see it in full detail here. Normal car-based blogging will resume shortly…

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Meet the Flintstones…

Lego Flintstones Car

…They’re the modern stone age family.
From the town of Bedrock,
They’re a page right out of history.

Let’s ride with the family down the street.
Through the courtesy of Fred’s two feet.

When you’re with the Flintstones
Have a yabba dabba doo time.
A dabba doo time.
We’ll have a gay old time!

You can have a gay old time too, courtesy of hachiroku24 on Flickr. Click the link to make the jump.

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Lotus 43 – BRM H16 | Picture Special

Lego Lotus 43 BRM H16

Race car building legend Luca Rusconi (aka RoscoPC) has been building his stunning historic racing cars for the best part of a decade. He’s recently uploaded another one of his glorious creations to Flickr (where we hope many more will follow), and thus we’re able to publish it here. It’s also one of the weirder racing cars in Luca’s garage, although it might not look remarkable at first glance.

Any classic racing fan will know of the incredible performances of the Lotus F1 team. Led by Colin Chapman, and powered by the legendary Cosworth DFV engine, the partnership delivered four Driver and five Constructor World Championship titles. However, before the DFV was ready Chapman needed an engine to put into his new 43 Formula 1 car for the 1966 season. He turned to previous Championship Winners BRM, and their unique P75 H16 engine.

Lego Lotus 43 BRM H16

Yup, H16. Basically two Flat-8 engines stacked on top of one another, yet only 3 litres in capacity. Unfortunately the unusual design was unusual for a reason – reliability. Or lack of it.

Heavy, extremely complicated, and constantly breaking, the BRM engine in Chapman’s Lotus 43 caused it to retire from every race bar one during the 1966 season. However, that one finish was a race win at the United States Grand Prix at Watkins Glen, showing that when it worked, the Lotus 43 was quick. Really Quick.

The following year in ’67 the new Cosworth DFV 3 litre V8 engine was ready, Ford added their sponsorship to it (in a stroke of marketing genius), and the year after that the DFV starting a Championship Winning streak that went unbroken for seven years.

Lego BRM H16 Engine

BRM’s mental P75 H16 engine was quickly forgotten, although the team continued to produce Formula 1 cars until the late 1970s, and Lotus forged on with a Cosworth partnership that was to become one of the most successful ever seen in the sport.

However, we think the Lotus 43 BRM H16 deserves a little recognition. It was a race winner after all, and for a brief moment two of Britain’s greatest F1 teams combined to produce something, well…  a little bit crap.

RoscoPC’s homage to that disastrous partnership pictured here was first built in 2010 and is now available to view in wonderful detail on Flickr. It features working steering, suspension, beautiful detailing, and – of course – a recreation of one of the maddest engines ever seen in Formula 1.

You can see all of the images of Luca’s incredible Lotus 43 build at his photostream via the link above, and if you’re curious to know what an H16 Formula 1 engine sounds like, click here…

Lego Lotus 43 BRM H16

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Naked Bike

Naked Bike

Brian Kescenovitz‘s tiny creation caught the tiny eyes and minds of our workforce because of its name. Indeed we’ve had to keep his original title for this blog post, just to satisfy a hoard of tittering and sniggering Elves. Brian’s motorcycle caught our eyes because it’s highly detailed, with some very novel parts usage and connections. Click this link to his Photostream and scroll down to see more of Brian’s tiny motorbikes.

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Tampa Bay Ferrari Dealership – Picture Special

Lego Ferrari Dealership

Constructed from around 36,000 pieces and 4 years in the making, this is one of the largest Lego projects that this site has ever featured. Ryan Link, a regular bloggee here at The Lego Car Blog, has been very busy.

Huge Lego Ferrari Dealership

Loosely based on the Tampa Bay Ferrari dealership, Ryan has designed and built a home for the eight Ferrari models that he has constructed over the past few years. Measuring 192×144 studs, Ryan’s enormous creation can easily house his collection, and features a wealth of incredible detailing, including brick-built wall mosaics depicting classic Ferrari models, beautiful Ferrari lettering, and even a couple of wonderfully intricate prancing horse logos too.

Lego Ferrari Dealership

The shot above shows just how good the aforementioned mosaics and logos look, which feature throughout the interior of the dealership including in the showroom, customer lounge and accessories area, and workshop, all of which are lit by a third-party LED system integrated into the roof of the build.

Lego Ferrari Models

The stars of Ryan’s incredible build are of course the Ferrari models which it was built to house, and they include a 458 Italia, Enzo, LaFerrari, 599 GTB, Testarossa, F12 Berlinetta, and even a fully liveried Ferrari team truck, all of which have been published here.

Lego Ferrari Models

There’s a whole lot more of this spectacular creation to see at Ryan Link’s photostream and we cannot recommend clicking this link enough. LEGO, Ferrari… if ever you visit this little corner of the internet; invite Ryan out for a chat – we think the officially licensed Ferrari range of LEGO sets could so with a bit of expansion…

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Autobots, Roll Out!

Lego Transformers Autobots

It’s been a while since we let the Elves watch a Transformers movie. This is partly because they’ve not found much in the way of Transformers-related builds, but mostly because after the abomination of ‘Transformers 4 – Age of Extinction’ we just couldn’t stomach any more Michael Bay directed nonsense.

Today though, we’ve relented, because one of their number returned with this cache of superb fully Transformable Autobots courtesy of Alex Jones aka Orion Pax.

Each creation is an ingenious work of art, and you can now build them for yourself, as Alex has released a new book containing step-by-step building instructions! There’s more to see via the link above, where you can also find a link to Amazon where Alex’s book is available to buy.

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The Killer Years

Lego Ferrari 126C F1 Car Villeneuve

Formula 1 is – whilst not without its risks – relatively safe today. For almost all of the sport’s history however, it was a insanely dangerous place to be. Even as late as the 1980s Formula 1 drivers (and others involved in F1 trackside) were dying on a regular basis. This car belongs to one such driver, the hugely popular Gilles Villeneuve, who was tragically killed at Zolder in Belgium after just 5 years in the sport.

Gilles joined Formula 1 after winning the Formula Atlantic championship in both the US and Canada in 1976, debuting with McLaren in ’77 before World Champions Ferrari took him on for the ’78 season. In May of 1982 Gilles collided with the back of Jochen Mass’ car during qualifying, with Mass on a slow lap and Gilles on a fast one. Both drivers saw each other at the last moment, both took evasive action, and both moved to the right…

The Ferrari disintegrated, and Gilles, still strapped into his seat, exited the car and hit the catch fencing, fatally breaking his neck. Formula 1 had lost one of it’s most loved drivers.

Lego Ferrari 126C2

Gilles is now remembered at his home track in Canada, renamed in his honour, and both at Zolder in Belgium and San Marino in Italy, each with a corner named after him. Yesterday marks 35 years since Gilles’ death, and race car building legend Luca Rusconi aka RoscoPC has paid tribute by uploading his incredible recreation of Gilles’ 1982 Ferrari 126C2 Formula 1 car to Flickr, 5 years after he first designed it.

Luca’s model is one of the most spectacular Lego recreations of a classic Formula 1 car that you will ever see, and its beauty lies as much within as it does on the surface, with working suspension complete with anti-roll bars, a 6-cylinder engine and full remote control drive and steering.

There’s more to see of Gilles Villeneuve’s Ferrari 126C2 at Luca’s Flickr gallery – click here to make the trip.

Lego Ferrari 126C F1 Car Villeneuve

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Biker’s Paradise

Lego Technic Motorbikes

The Lego Car Blog Team own some interesting cars, as you’d probably expect from a website as nerdily automotive as this one, but no motorbikes. This is because if we owned motorcycles this blog would never have made it to five years old, and our organs would now belong to other people.

However despite our aversion to owning motorbikes, we do still rather like them, and fortunately newcomer Nesme Laurent (aka NEMOOZ) allows us to indulge in this passion from the safety of a comfy chair.

Laurent has built almost fifty Technic replica motorcycles, from manufacturers including BMW, Ducati, MV Agusta, Moto Guzzi, Honda, KTM, Yamaha, and Kawasaki, each features a variety of working functions, and instructions are available for many of the designs too.

You can see a selection of Laurent’s builds at his newly created MOCpage, and you can see the full back-catalogue of fifty or so bikes via Brickshelf.

Lego Technic Motorcycles

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Red Spider

Lego Alfa Romeo Spider

Is there a more disappointing automotive brand than Alfa Romeo? We’re going to say no, and the disappointment started with this car.

Launched in 1966, the pretty Pininfarina-designed Alfa Romeo Spider was at the cutting edge of sports car engineering. A twin-cam engine, 5-speed gearbox, and disc brakes all featured, and whilst the Alfa cost nearly as much as an E-Type Jaguar, it found plenty of buyers willing to spend a bit to drive something so gorgeous.

And then Alfa Romeo just kept making it. And making it. And making it. The final Series 4 version of the car (pictured here) was released in 1990, thirty-six years after the Series 1 debuted, wearing a stupid 1990s bodykit and featuring tail-lights robbed from the 164 sedan.

The striking GTV finally replaced the Spider in 1995, but it was a flash in the pan moment for a brand that had traded on the past glories of its badge for far too long. Years of automotive drivel followed, mostly re-badged Fiats in pretty dresses – which wasn’t a good starting point, and Alfa Romeo seemed on the verge of disappearing altogether.

But now something remarkable has happened. Alfa Romeo are back. And not just with a Fiat in a pretty dress. The new Guilia sedan and Stelvio (whisper it)… SUV are receiving properly good reviews, and could finally be the saviours of the brand that we’ve been awaiting for so long. So cross your fingers, and your toes, and try to forget about cars like the Series 4 Spider.

Oh, we nearly forgot! This excellent Model Team recreation of the Series 4 comes from previous bloggee Andre Pinto, and there’s more to see at his photostream by clicking here.

Lego Alfa Romeo Spider

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Sacrilege

Lego Ferrari 250 GTO Gasser

And yet… somehow… rather cool. Even so, we’re glad this Ferrari 250 GTO (variants of which are the most valuable cars ever sold at auction) gasser hot rod exists only in Danish plastic.

Previous bloggee Tim Inman possesses the slightly warped mind that created this, and there’s more to see at his Flickr photostream via the link above.

Lego Ferrari 250 GTO Gasser

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Let’s go to the Beach…

Lego Surfer Hot Rod

Let’s go to the beach, each
Let’s go get a wave
They say, what they gonna say?
Have a drink, clink, found the Bud Light
Bad bitches like me, is hard to come by.

The profound words of well-known poet Nicki Minaj there, whose affront to music perfectly captions this neat mini-figure scene from Flickr’s sanellukovic. There’s more to see of his excellent Town-scale hot rod complete with Wolverine-esque driver at his photostream – click the link above to catch a wave.

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Kapow! Bump! Wham!

Lego Batman Bumper Car Dodgem

Has there ever been a more perfect mash-up than this? 1960’s Batman – he of exploding-pop-out ‘Batwords’ fame – and a dodgem car surely means a cacophony of pop-up onomatopoeia at the fun fair. TLCB regular Redfern1950s is the builder and you can buy a ticket to the Gothem dodgems via the link above.

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Model Mechanics

Lego Technic Hammerhead Supercar

Mechanics. They seem to appear less and less frequently here at TLCB. Such is the prevalence of LEGO’s (excellent) Power Functions electronics that mechanically operable functions have become a bit old-hat. However when done well, mechanical features can result in a model that’s more than a match for anything with a motor shoved in it.

Today we have one such example suggested to us by a reader, and it doesn’t have a battery box in sight. Built by Didumos69 of Eurobricks what it does have is a wealth of mechanical engineering, including all-wheel suspension, working steering, hand-adjustable seats, and a functioning sequential gearbox hooked up to a V8 piston engine.

You can see full details of the model at the Eurobricks forum via the link above, which includes detailed steps showing how each functional element was engineered. Click the link in the text above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Hammerhead Supercar

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