Street Punk

The future can seem a bleak and daunting place, where Miami is under an ocean that contains more plastic than fish, and where the Amazon is just a smouldering ash heap. Lego builders are often far more optimistic than this TLCB writer though, either predicting a Mad Max style post-apocalyptic party of thunderous V8 hot rods and pointy metal hats, or a colourful electrical megacity filled with glowing excitement. It’s the latter we have for you today, courtesy of TLCB debutant Lego-nuts and his superb cyberpunk street scene. A pair of Tron-style motorcycles provide the vehicular link, ready to race through a perfect midnight city backdrop. Head to the streets of the future via the link above and join the race.

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Training Gagarin

We don’t really know much about trains (we are a car blog after all), but we do still like them. Especially when they’re as detailed and colourful as this one is. A PKP ST44-1112 ‘Comrade Gagarin’ (apparently…), it’s been built by Mateusz Waldowski of Flickr, and it is quite wonderfully made and presented. An assortment of five beautifully-built trucks are in tow behind the locomotive, making Mateusz’s model really rather large indeed, with lovely attention-to-detail throughout. Head to Flickr via the link above to see more of the train tribute to the first man in space.

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Mellow Yellow

It’s a small scale day here at The Lego Car Blog. Previous bloggee Tim Henderson proves you don’t need a billion bricks to build something deeply cool. See more of his 6-wide ’60s sedan on Flickr via the link.

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Petite Porsche

This is a Porsche 917K, one of the most successful endurance racing car designs of all time, and it’s been recreated to near perfection in miniature by Flickr’s K MP. Wearing the 1970 Le Mans winning livery K MP’s 917 captures the real car brilliantly and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link above.

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Super Stratos Stradale

The Lancia Stratos was not a good road car. Uncomfortable, unreliable, and almost comically badly designed, there’s a reason that Lancia are barely around today (and so sad is their current single offering it’d probably be better if they weren’t. What’s going on Fiat?!). However, the Lancia Stratos rally car was a very different matter…

Powered by a mid-mounted Ferrari V6 the Stratos won three consecutive World Rally Championships, in ’74, ’75 and ’76. It might have won more too, were it not for parent company Fiat switching their focus (and therefore funding) to their own brand in ’77.

Such results have made the Lancia Stratos a hugely sought after car, despite the road variants being pretty rubbish. A better bet (and probably better built) is this Technic version from James Tillson, which recreates the Stratos brilliantly in Lego form.

Like the real car the front and rear bodywork opens, revealing the transversly-mounted V6 engine, working suspension, and functioning steering, with remote control delivered by Power Functions motors and a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery.

There’s more to see of James’ Technic Lancia Stratos in both Stradale and Group B specification on Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum – take a look via the links in the text above, plus you can read our review of the BuWizz bluetooth battery that controls and powers it by clicking here.

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Grappling Aid

As has been well documented on this site, TLCB writers know absolutely nothing about sci-fi. Which year the Morris Minor switched from 820cc to 950cc? Yes*. Space? No. So instead you’re getting commentary on this excellent spacecraft by Flickr’s Nuno Taborda that refers to it as a cross between a grappling hook and something from your Mom’s ‘special friends’ chest. See more of this burgling-tool-come-sex-aid via the link above.

*1956

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Identify Any Brick, In the Blink of an Eye!

Back in April this year we stumbled across a very cool, OK, massively nerdy project. LEGO have produced a vast array of pieces over the years, everything from a flaming sword to a Deadpool duck head. No, we don’t know why either. Most of LEGO’s pieces however, are rather useful, but with so many made how do you know what it is you have (and need more of)? Piqabrick have the answer.

“Thanks to Artificial Intelligence, Piqabrick instantly identifies Lego bricks’ code, simplifying the long-lasting operations of searching and sorting.

Piqabrick easily and quickly identifies any Lego brick providing you the ID code and color code. How? Thanks to our proprietary computer vision technology. Piqabrick “looks at” a brick to identify it, just like we already do… but better!”

Sounds cool right? OK, not cool – massively nerdy again, but really bloody useful. Better still, Piqabrick has no monthly or yearly fee: it’s free for a lifetime.

If you’d like to find out more about how Piqabrick works and pledge so that the tool can become a reality then visit the Piqabrick Kickstarter campaign via the link below!

Piqabrick on Kickstarter

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Mazzive

This is a MAZ-535; massive, a little aesthetically challenging, and able to get really dirty. Just like your Mom. It comes from Lego-building legend Sariel (whose Build a LEGO Mustang book we reviewed here last week) and it’s a triumph of Technic engineering.

Underneath the wonderfully accurate Model Team exterior, complete with opening doors, engine hatches and LED head and tail lights, is a fully working replica of the MAZ’s incredible 8×8 drivetrain.

Four Power functions XL motors drive all eight wheels, the front four of which turn on separate radiuses. All eight wheels feature planetary hubs and are suspended via pendular axles, allowing Sariel’s model to go anywhere it is possible for a Lego creation to go, or to pull a chair across a wooden floor according to the accompanying video.

A working V12 piston engine is mounted inside, along with a pneumatically operated high/low gearbox providing the model with two speeds (slow, and really slow), and the motorised drive, steering, lighting and gearbox can all be controlled remotely thanks to a third-party SBrick bluetooth control.

There’s much more to see of this amazing creation at Sariel’s MAZ-535 Flickr album, on the Eurobricks forum, or via the video below. Click the links to take a look, plus you can read Sariel’s interview here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking here.

YouTube Video

 

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Road of Bones

The R504 Kolyma Highway, also known as the ‘Road of Bones’, is one of the grimmest construction projects in history. It’s not some distant relic either, being completed in 1953, with the bones of those that died building it (who were forced to do so under Stalinist Communism) laid underneath.

Chris Perron‘s ‘Ridge Ranger’ rover is far from grim, being a brightly-coloured homage to the concept art of Darren Bartley. It does however feature some ingenious (but rather grim if you’re a LEGO mini-figure) wheels, constructed from dozens of dismembered mini-figure arms. Yuk!

We genuinely can’t figure out how Chris has built said wheels, but they mean his rover drives upon a road of bones wherever it goes. See if you can work out how he’s done it via the link above, although we bet your mini-figures are hoping you can’t…

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Flight of the Phoenix

MOCpages isn’t quite dead yet. Most of our Elves stationed at the once-default creation sharing site have been redeployed elsewhere as – thanks to the site’s frequent outages – the community has all but departed it. However, proving that gems can still be discovered in the abandoned mine is yamato yukimasa, making his TLCB debut with this wonderful six-engine twin-boom bomber. It’s a huge creation featuring some lovely building techniques and there’s more to see on MOCpages (if it’s working of course) via the link above. Take a look whilst we feed a very hungry Elf that’s thankful to have finally come home…

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More Than Meets the Eye

It’s a happy day for the Elves here at TLCB Towers as a number of them found these brilliant Transformers Autobots by Flickr’s Alex Jones (aka Orion Pax). Normally this would have led to an Elf fight, but in a rare moment of Elven cooperation they approached us with their finds collectively, in the hope that Transformers cartoons would be played. Their peaceful approach has been rewarded, with the discovering Elves duly awarded a meal token each and all Elves here at the Towers now contentedly watching Transformers cartoons. You can thank Alex for the harmony via the link above, where you can find his excellent transforming Ironhide, Cosmos, Powerglide, Mirage, Hoist, Jazz, Blaster, and Bumblebee Autobots.

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Made of More

Ireland’s most famous export, Guinness has been a fixture of bars around the world for over 250 years. It has therefore probably been responsible for more fights, more babies, and more drunken singing than any other product in history, and the world is all the better for that.

Getting Guinness around the world is not quite as important as it used to be, with the beer now brewed in nearly 50 counties, however Ireland remains its home, which is a country where this incredible Guinness tanker truck by Flickr’s jarekwally would almost certainly never be located.

Ireland’s roads are tiny, twisty and laced with sheep, making them wholly unsuited to a truck like this, but we don’t mind because jarekwally’s build looks spectacular.

There’s more to see of his stunning Guinness truck/tanker trailer at his photostream – head to the bar via the link above and pour a pint…

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Ploughing On

This site was terribly sad to report the death of truck building legend Ingmar Spijkhoven earlier this year, after losing his fight with motor neurone disease, an illness that currently has with no cure. Several of his fellow builders have been paying tribute to Ingmar in the most appropriate way; by building incredible trucks inspired by his designs. Dirk Klijn is one of them, and has developed this superb snow plough from Ingmar’s ‘T12’ truck.

Based on Ingmar’s original design, Dirk’s truck includes remote control drive and steering (operable via bluetooth thanks to a third-party SBrick), a pneumatic compressor to position the plough blade, a working salt spreader, and all-wheel-suspension. Dirk’s model will be on show at the Lego World Utrecht show alongside several Ingmar tributes and you can see more of the build on Flickr via the link above, plus you can see all of Ingmar’s incredible trucks to feature here over the years via the search bar on this site.

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The Lego Steam Company

Extinction Rebellion wouldn’t like this. Steampunk, that odd mashup of Victorian tech applied to modern inventions, is thankfully pure whimsy. Sure the brass, iron and wood look damn cool, but that’s a whole lotta coal, and however many times the orange man-child in charge of the free world puts the word ‘clean’ in front of it, coal just isn’t.

Fortunately most of the world (we said most, and we’re looking at you China…) have moved off burning the black stuff, and its use in the modern world is now solely a retro throwback for train and traction engine enthusiasts. Which in a way makes dioramas such as this one all the more magical, as coal is now largely a historical relic.

This gorgeous (and enormous) steampunk display has been built for the Lego World Utrecht 2019 show by builders Brick Rebel and Monstrophonic and is certainly the most stunning display we’ve seen this year. An assortment of delightfully impractical vehicles feature, including airships, a monorail, a steamboat, and even an elevator, all powered by coal in the imagination and by Power Functions electric motors in the display, bringing this spectacular collaboration to life.

There’s loads more to see of this incredible display at both Brick Rebel and Monstrophonic’s photostreams via the links above, plus you can see their ‘Lego Steam Company’ build in person at the Lego World Utrecht 2019 show.

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Pieces of Eighty

OK, we’re not sure how many pieces Flickr’s Robert4168/Garmadon has actually used to build ‘Montroy’s Flagship’, but it’s not many. What we are sure of is that Robert has demonstrated brilliantly that with just a handful of bricks you can create something blogworthingly wonderful. See more at the link.

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