Author Archives: thelegocarblogger

Seventy Years of Service

HM Queen Elizabeth II

1926 to 2022

My Other Chevy’s a Chevy

The brand new 10304 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 set is a fantastic addition to LEGO’s real-world vehicle line-up. But what if you prefer your Chevy’s a little more… trucky? Previous bloggee Tomáš Novák (aka PsychoWard666) has the answer, having converted his 10304 Camaro into this excellent mid-80s Chevrolet C10 pick-up, using only the parts from the official LEGO set.

Building instructions are available if you fancy having a go yourself, and there’s more to see of Tomáš’ classic Chevrolet B-Model at both his Flickr photostream and the Eurobricks forum. Click the links above to swap one Chevy for another.

The Most Expensive Car in the World…

…can now be yours! The Ferrari 250 GTO is today worth approximately $70 million. That’s the equivalent to the entire annual value of smallest economy in the world (Tuvalu), 3,500 new Toyota Corollas, 1/3 of a Zlatan Ibrahimovic, or 1/35th of an Elon Musk. Which puts it slightly out of reach even for us here at The Lego Car Blog.

Flickr’s barneius can help though, having built this most excellent 314-piece Speed Champions recreation of the world’s most valuable car, and made building instructions available too, so you can create it for yourself. Click the link above to pretend you’ve got more money than Tuvalu.

Elf.

The Elf. Green, weird looking, and rather small. Of course we had to publish this one.

First produced in 1959 and still sold today, Isuzu’s Elf light truck has seen six generations, been built in over twenty manufacturing facilities, and worn a multitude of badges on its nose, including Chevrolet, Nissan, Mazda, Hino, GMC and Bedford.

This is the first, as built from 1959 to 1968, and recreated here beautifully by regular bloggee 1saac W. 1saac’s model wears the marks of its life wonderfully (much like our own Elves), and there’s more of it to see at his photostream via the link above. Take a look whilst we award an extra Smartie to the Elf that found it.

Big Wheel Keep on Turnin’*

“That’s not a car” we hear you thinking to yourselves. Er, well no, it isn’t. But it is probably one of the few vehicles on earth that – along with the Cozy Coupe Coupe – almost all of us have had a go driving. The primary coloured ‘Big Wheel’ tricycle is the shared beginning for countless lifetimes of automotive journeying, and Jacob sadovich‘s Lego recreation is so perfect we can almost hear the trundling of the wheels and feel the knee strain in getting it up the driveway. Go for a pedal at Jacob’s photostream via the link above – It may have been decades, but we bet you already know exactly how it drives.

*Today’s title song.

Suzuki’s Peak

If you’re of a certain age (like this TLCB Writer) then you will absolutely know this car.

Playstation’s Gran Turismo 2 ruled racing games in the late ’90s. Populated with all manner of awesome mostly-Japanese cars from the county’s car-building zenith, pixilated racing glory could be yours at the wheel of an Impreza, a Skyline GT-R, a Supra, an RX-7, or a multitude of other machinery.

Of course you had to work your way up through a soup of crappy Suzukis and Daihatsus to get to the good stuff, but even they had some late ’90s monsters available in digital form. OK, Daihatsu didn’t, but Suzuki did; the mighty Escudo Pikes Peak.

Based on the humble Vitara (although it resembled the Vitara about as much as this TLCB Writer does Ryan Reynolds), the Escudo Pikes Peak produced almost 1,000bhp from a mid-mounted bi-turbo V6, and could do o-60mph in 3.5 seconds. On gravel.

Built for one race (the Pikes Peak…), the Suzuki Escudo won the 1995 event in the hands Nobuhiro Tajima, before he returned in the mid-’00s to win a further six consecutive Pike Peaks with Suzuki, by which time the Escudo was already a legend with an entire generation of Playstation owners.

This instantly recognisable Speed Champions homage to the iconic Gran Turismo 2 star and Suzuki outlier comes from Sergio Batista, with custom decals and bespoke wheels maximising the realism (far beyond what 1999 gaming graphics could manage…).

Building instructions are available and you can re-live your youth at Sergio’s photostream via the link above.

Newnimog

Making not only their TLCB debut, but their MOCing debut too, today’s creation publicises a newcomer to the online Lego community via a well-trodden path; the Mercedes-Benz Unimog.

We’ve featured dozens of brick-built Unimogs here over the years, and TLCB debutant Rajesh Sriram (aka Voldemort87) adds another to the roster, with his excellent fully RC truck trial version of the famous off-road truck.

PoweredUp motors deliver the all-wheel drive, steering, and high/low gearbox, whilst the cabin tilts, there’s a working piston engine, and all-wheel suspension too.

There’s more to see of Rajesh’s first published MOC at both Eurobricks and Flickr, and you can take a look via the links above.

 

Say Yes to the Dress(ta)


This is a Dressta TD-25M bulldozer, and it’s about as good a Lego creation as you’ll see this year.

Built by Bricksley of Flickr, this incredible model blends Model Team aesthetics, PoweredUp motors, pneumatics, and Mindstorms to create a perfectly working 1:18 replica of the Polish crawler-dozer.

A LEGO Mindstorms hub can be operated by an Xbox controller to remotely drive the four PoweredUp motors that power both the tracks and the pneumatic system that provides movement the front blade and rear ripper, whilst LED lights and even a working horn and back-up warning sound feature.

It’s an amazing build and one of which you can see more at Bricksley’s Dressta DT-25M’ album on Flickr – Click the link above to say yes to the Dressta.

Space Crane

Are you a Classic Spaceperson in need of a habitation pod on your newly discovered planet? Then you need a Neo-Classic Space Sky Crane!

Able to land a fully self-contained living quarters onto almost any surface (liquid and gas planets not included), the Neo-Classic Space Sky Crane will enable you to continue your Classic Space research 24/7!

Contact Pascal Neo-Classic Space Sky Cranes for a free no obligation quote, and advance your Classic Space exploration today!

Ute Beaut

The sedan-based pick-up known as the ‘Coupe Utility’ is an icon of Australian motoring. Built by all of Australia’s indigenous manufacturers, and with a few others importing to Australia too, they were hugely popular in decades past.

But with Australian motor manufacturing having ceased in recent years, the Australian ‘Ute’ has almost died out, although the body type lives on (in a smaller form) in South America.

Flickr’s chris.elliott.art remembers the golden age of the Aussie ute however, with this ace ‘1971 Aussie Turbo Coupe Utility’.

Based on no particular model, but somehow looking like all of them, Chris’ ute captures the Australian motoring icon brilliantly, and there’s more to see of his superbly presented creation at his Flickr album. Click the link above to visit Australia some time in the early ’70s.

Competition Coupe

If you’re a 1960s drag racing fan, seven, or a TLCB Elf, this post is for you. 1960’s ‘Competition Coupe’ drag racers were little more than the back two-thirds of a 1920s-30s coupe attached to two girders, with a ginormous V8 mounted mostly where the windshield should be. They were gloriously stupid, which of course means TLCB staff love them too. This one comes from previous bloggee Tim Inman, and you can tear up the strip c1966 via the link above!

Build in Low-Res

No your screen hasn’t suddenly gone low-res. The reason for the Minecraft-esque appearance of today’s creation is that it has been constructed (no doubt tediously) using solely 1×2 plates. Yup, everything from the windscreen to the wheels of Chris Doyle‘s Jeep is built only from LEGO’s second-smallest part, which assuredly makes this the least detailed (and yet one of the most ingenious) creations that this site has ever featured. Head over to Flickr to pretend you’re in a video game c1995!

That’s a Doozy

Yes, the title phrase ‘That’s a Doozy’ – used to describe something opulent, enormous or unusual – really did come from society’s reaction to the Duesenberg cars that were built from the 1920s until 1940. Which must make it the world’s first automotive meme. Take that ‘VTEC just kicked in yo’.

The largest, most powerful, and most expensive cars on the market, Duesenberg’s can today sell for over $22 million, which rather prices TLCB out of ownership. Fortunately this delightful brick-built Duesenberg SJ is rather more attainable, having been suggested to us a by a reader.

Flickr’s 1saac W. is the builder and there’s more to see of his Doozy of a build at his photostream via the link.

Picking an Alternate

The new LEGO Technic 42144 Material Handler is an impressive looking set. But it’s also really pricey, so – like anything expensive – it’s best to get maximum use out of it. At least, that’s the approach this writer takes with TLCB Executive Washroom & Sauna.

Cue M_longer, who has repurposed the pieces from the aforementioned set to create this neat cherry picker truck. A pneumatic hoist with a rotating turntable, working steering, and mechanical stabilisers feature, plus building instructions are available, so other owners of 42144 can both handle material and pick cherries too.

There’s more to see of M_longer’s 42144 alternate at Eurobricks and Bricksafe, and you can pick your way over via the links in the text above.

Black-AT

In some kind of TLCB nightmare, Flickr’s Jens Ådne J. Rydland has managed a gloriously successful mashup of two sci-fi themes about which we know nothing. So here’s one of those walking things from Star Wars merged with LEGO’s own Blacktron and Ice Planet themes, for a reference so nerdy it’s probably got adenoids. Join the sci-fi convention via the link above, whilst this TLCB Staffer tries to counterbalance writing this by drinking a beer and giving a wedgie to one of the Elves or something.