Tag Archives: A380

Emirates Airbus A380 | Picture Special

Some Lego builders’ user names are just right. This is BigPlanes’ Emirates Airlines Airbus A380 Superjumbo, and it is really, really big.

With a wingspan of 7ft, BigPlanes’ recreation of the world’s largest passenger plane is a constructed in an almost unbelievable mini-figure scale, and uses no hidden supports, metal framework, or glue.

What it does use is tens of thousands of LEGO pieces, several electric motors, and a whole lot of LED lights to faithfully replicate Emirates’ flagship airliner, including both decks, a four-pilot cockpit, working flaps and tail control surfaces, retractable landing gear, and even powered engines.

Each class of travel is accurately represented too, from First (which features a bar, lounge, and even a waterfall fountain), through Business (with fold flat seats and individual screens), to Premium Economy (where passengers’ benefit from their knees not being a structural element of the seat in front), and finally Economy (basically a cattle-truck).

Beautiful spiral staircases link the two decks, which also include luxury bathrooms in First (and holes in the floor for Economy), galley kitchens, and even crew sleeping accommodation.

A monumental undertaking a year in the making, BigPlanes’ phenomenal determination and skill has resulted in surely one of the finest Lego creations ever built. Buy your ticket to fly Emirates at his astonishing ‘LEGO Emirates Airbus A380’ album on Flickr, where forty incredible images are available to view. It’s probably worth spending a little extra to upgrade to Premium Economy though…

To Fly. To Serve.

Lego Airbus A380 British AirwaysThis incredible model is a little outside our usual field here at The Lego Car Blog, but much too special for us to overlook. The work of Ed Diment, aka Lego Monster on Flickr, it’s a commission piece that now hangs in one of the shops in London-Heathrow Airport.

It is of course a replica of the magnificent Airbus A380 in British Airways livery. It’s also in 1:55 scale, which ordinarily would mean a model not very big at all. In this case 1:55 equates to a truly massive creation. Ed is a professional model builder for Bright Bricks, and you can see all the photos of the awe-inspiring piece on Flickr at the link above.