Tag Archives: Cooper

Speed Champions 2019 | Set Previews!

LEGO Speed Champions 2019 Sets

A few weeks ago a crack team of The Lego Car Blog Elves were dispatched over the perimeter wall of The LEGO Company’s HQ by way of the office catapult. Tasked with uncovering LEGO’s new-for-2019 sets, those that made it back to TLCB Towers would be revered as heroes, whilst their fallen comrades would be mourned for around 15 minutes, before we all moved on with our lives.

Today the lucky survivors able to out-run a Danish alsatian see the fruits of their courageous mission revealed to you, our readers – and what tasty fruits they are! So without any further pointless preamble, here are the brand new 2019 LEGO Speed Champions sets!

LEGO 75893 Dodge Challenger Demon & Dodge Charger

LEGO’s partnerships with real-world car manufacturers is (and we may be a bit biased given the title of this website), one of their best ever decisions. The sets resulting from the tie-ups to date have been almost universally excellent, so it’s little wonder that LEGO and other manufacturers are looking to partner. Dodge become a new addition to LEGO universe for 2019, joining the likes of Mercedes-Benz, Aston Martin, Porsche, Volkswagen, Ford, Volvo, Ferrari and others.

Their first set is 75893 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon & Dodge Charger RT, a wonderful duel car homage to Dodge’s fastest products. A brilliant classic 1970 Charger (complete with a huge drag-racing supercharger) competes against the brand’s latest 2018 SRT Demon at a drag strip, with three mini-figures and the drag racing ‘christmas tree’ lights included. Each car looks faithfully accurate – although some of that accuracy is admittedly due to stickers, and with just under 500 pieces 75893 looks to be an excellent addition to the expanding officially-licensed Speed Champions line-up.

LEGO 75890 Speed Champions Ferrari F40 Competizione

Next we have a vehicle from one of the first manufacturers to partner with LEGO – it wouldn’t be Speed Champions without Ferrari! With 198 pieces the new 75890 Ferrari F40 Competizione set marks the entry point to the 2019 Speed Champions range, and brings one of the most famous supercars ever made back into LEGO form after its last appearance as the 1,158-piece 10248 Creator F40 set from 2015.

Although considerably smaller than its predecessor, 75890 is nevertheless a brilliantly accurate little set. This version of the F40 is the Competizione, or racing car to you and me, and thus it features a mini-figure racing driver, an all-important spanner, and switchable parts to convert the F40 from race to road. 75890 will reach stores in early 2019 and will be a roaring success.

LEGO 75892 Speed Champions McLaren Senna

LEGO’s third new Speed Champions set brings another previous partner back into the range; McLaren, with their mind-bending track-only Senna. With 219 pieces the 75892 McLaren Senna set is slightly more complicated than the Ferrari above, as is required by the fantastically intricate design of the real car. It’s an aesthetic that doesn’t seem to translate too well to LEGO in our opinion, and – despite what appear to be a few new pieces to help replicate the real Senna’s shape – 75892 looks to our eyes a bit of mess. Nevertheless for McLaren / supercar fans it’s sure to be a winner when it arrives alongside the other Speed Champions sets in January of next year.

LEGO 75891 Speed Champions Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

Chevrolet first joined the Speed Champions range a few years ago and they return to the line-up for 2019 with the 75891 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 Race Car set*. Another single-car set, 75891 brings Speed Champions into the world of NASCAR, although for licensing reasons you won’t find that link anywhere on the box. What you will find are 198 pieces, some of which are uniquely printed, a mini-figure complete with fuel-refill tank and the ubiquitous spanner, and a wealth of stickers to help recreate the ZL1 in LEGO form.

We’ve bemoaned the over-use of stickers rather than bricks to recreate real-world replicas in the past and the same is true here, but LEGO know their market, and also the most cost-effective way to hit the spot aesthetically. 75891 should be hit – especially amongst NASCAR fans!

*Plus an exciting new addition to the 2019 Technic range… but more on that another time!

LEGO 75894 Speed Champions Mini Cooper-S Rally & John Cooper Works Buggy

The fifth and final Speed Champions set new for 2019 brings another old favourite back onto shelves; Mini, with a pairing of the iconic 1960s Cooper-S and a 2018 John Cooper Works Buggy. A tricky thing to make from rectangular bricks, LEGO seem have done a superb job recreating the original Mini in mini-figure scale, and whilst there are stickers present they’re not used to create the shape of the car – bravo LEGO! The classic Cooper comes in rally car spec, complete with quad spot-lights and a roof-rack, and includes a mini-figure rally driver.

The John Cooper Works Buggy isn’t quite as successful, looking not all that much like the real thing. But we’re guessing that if you’re reading this and you’re eight, that won’t matter one bit! Featuring big rubber tyres, a workshop complete with tools, and some cool stickers, if we were eight we’d absolutely love it!

75894 Mini Cooper-S Rally and MINI John Cooper Works Buggy is the largest set in the 2019 range at 481 pieces including four mini-figures and will join the rest of the line-up in stores from January.

Which set is your favourite? We’ll take the classic Dodge Charger and recreate the train-jump scene from the first Fast and the Furious movie, although we’d really need a Speed Champions Toyota Supra to do it properly. Over to you LEGO…

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Three Wheels on My Wagon

Gene 3S’s 1966 Mini Cooper S has run into a problem on its way to Monte Carlo. Fortunately the car is well equipped with tools and a spare wheel on the roof. There are some nice details on this conventional, studs up car, plus the neat simply styled scene. The car is based on an actual Mk.1 Cooper S, LBL 6 D. The car is currently up for sale and you can see loads of photos by following this link, which is a great resource for building your own Mini Cooper or modifying LEGO’s official 10242 set.

Sadly Gene 3S’s model was TWOKed by a team of TLCB Elves just after the spare wheel was put on.  Apparently they were muttering something about stealing a gold shipment

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Buy a Mini… Get a Hot Rod

Lego Hot Rod 10242 Alternate

Minis seem to be popping up all over the place here today. Well this isn’t a Mini obviously, but it has been built exclusively from the parts found within the 10242 Mini Cooper Creator set. Like the Porsche 911 RSR featured here earlier today the builder of this 10242 alternate hot rod model has made instructions available, so that if you own the Mini Cooper set you can build your own. You can see more courtesy of Serge S on Flickr.

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Buy a Mini… Get a Porsche

Lego Porsche 911 RSR

LEGO’s 10242 official Mini Cooper set is a firm favourite here at TLCB Towers, but that’s no reason to stick to the prescribed instructions. Suggested to us by a reader, amaman of MOCpages has used the Mini’s excellent parts range to build something just a little bit quicker… Porsche’s monster 911 RSR. There are opening doors, hood and engine lid with a detailed interior an engine inside, and amaman has even photographed the build steps so that if you own 10242 you could build your own RSR too. You can see more of the build and check out how amaman has done it via the link to MOCpages above.

Lego Porsche 911 RSR

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Brick-Bean

Lego Mr. Bean Mini

LEGO’s 10242 Mini Cooper set received an excellent review here at TLCB earlier in the year, but Flickr’s Dornbi decided that his copy could benefit from a few, er… ‘household’ modifications… modifications that Mr. Bean was forced to put into practice back in 1994 following an eventful trip to the January sales.

You can see more of Dornbi’s brilliant modified 10242 set on Flickr at the link above, and the unique approach to automotive packaging by Mr. Bean on which this model is based by clicking here.

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Mini-Beast

Lego Mini Cooper Arachnid

Well this is something we never imagined we’d be posting… Sariel has, er… ‘modified’ LEGO’s official Mini Cooper set and given it legs! Creepy spidery moving legs.

You can see the Walking Mini in action on MOCpages, plus you read Sariel’s interview with TLCB here, and you can read our review of the official (wheeled) 10242 Mini Cooper set by clicking here.

YouTube Video:

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Maxi Mini

Lego Mini Cooper Redux

Every so often, you think of something so ridiculous that you wish it could be true.  A Mini Cooper monster truck, coincidentally, has always been one of our silly desires.  Conveniently, Tim Henderson over on Flickr has got us covered there. His delightfully absurd take on the recently-released 40109 Mini Cooper set makes us tingle with excitement and prompts thoughts of the pint-sized Mini getting its chance to tangle with the big boys…or just run them over, that works too.  You can check out Tim’s work on Flickr.

Lego 40109 Redux

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Mini Mini

 

10242-1

Welcome to our review of LEGO’s latest set for gearheads. If you’re from the UK and of a certain age, there’s a good chance your first car was one of these. Probably ten years old, falling apart with rust, smoking like the Flying Scotsman… maybe that was just mine, but how I loved it!

I am of course talking of the ‘UCS’ Mini, set no. 10242. This model depicts one of the later 1990s Coopers with much interior finery that my plastic-seated ’70s example may have lacked, but the appeal is the same. So long as it IS a classic Mini, not one of those BMW-sponsored supertankers that should probably be called Maxis, really…

Where were we? Ah yes, 10242, what’s it like?

Comparisons with the 10220 Camper Van (still available but probably not for long…) are inevitable, and 10242’s 1077 pieces for £75 looks slightly worse value than the Camper’s 1332 pieces for £80. Naturally, the model’s smaller as well… still, all those rare pieces in dark green make up some of the difference for MOCers.

The box looks to be the same size as the VW’s, and it looks good, with a tempting pic of the Mini on the front, and the rear showcasing all the opening features and interior detail. Appetite suitably whetted, it’s time to liberate the instructions and get to building.

It’s a fun build, with not too much repetition all things considered, and there’s some neat solutions, especially in the way they’ve designed-in the half-plate gap behind the doors that enable them to close smoothly whilst keeping the curve at the top of the side panel. There’s not quite as much surprise-and-delight in this as there was in the camper, but there is some; the spare wheel under the hinged boot floor may not be realistic, but it is a nice detail that leaves this Mini with probably more boot space than a real one…

After a not-too-taxing couple of hours, you’ll have a good looking model.

The front looks excellent. The lights, grille and bumper are all in proportion and the sloped bonnet opens to reveal the detailed engine. This isn’t quite as detailed as it could be, but what’s there is nice enough. In answer to many a MOCer’s prayer, the headlights are about two and a half studs across which makes them exactly the right size. Hurrah! for that. The silvered pin joiners used for the bumpers are very pleasing too.

Moving rearwards, and things are not quite so rosy; the lower parts of the bodysides are fine – excellent, in fact, with the printed stripe on the curved elements that form the top part of the side panels – but the pillar / window treatment lets the side down, literally… It’s those slope pieces for the ‘screen pillars, with stickers that attempt to black out the portion of slope brick that shouldn’t be there. To my eyes, this doesn’t work at all, and yes I did put the stickers on straight…

Those green wheelarch pieces are brilliant, though. Nice going for what’s really a windscreen piece! The wheels are nice too, doing a convincing impression of the ‘Minilite’ design that was always popular on these.

At the rear, another nice and shiny bumper, above which is an opening bootlid that’s almost but not quite exactly the right shape. It’s a good try, though. Maybe it’s the too-steep angle of the rear screen that does it, but it doesn’t look quite right from some angles at the back.

If the above sounds like nit-picking, blame the VW Camper for setting the bar so high. While this model IS a good representation of a Mini Cooper, there are several areas where it could be better. The one area where the Camper could have been better has at least been nailed on the Mini…

And another thing; when are LEGO going to stop using tiny minifig levers where something three times the size would be better? Answers on a postcard please… It’s the roof-mounted aerial this time and it looks ridiculous.

Inside, it gets better. The roof lifts off to reveal the beautifully detailed seats with their chequered trim, and a perfectly detailed dashboard with the sort of late – ’90s wood veneer that was almost definitely not plastic… The front seats tip forward to allow your imaginary figures into the cramped rear bench. This is a couple of studs too far forward, presumably to give enough boot space for that utterly delightful picnic basket, complete with fabric towel. And a piece of ‘cheese’ that’s actually a piece of cheese; gotta love that Danish humour!

The only criticism inside is the massive steering wheel.

One very nice detail is a choice of number plates according to your chosen European country. The English ‘R’ registration makes this a 1997 model. Also very English is the colour: British Racing Green, no less, and it looks great with the white bonnet stripes and roof.

Overall, it’s a good model. A nice thing to have if you’re a Mini fan. It doesn’t quite achieve the dizzy heights of quality of the Camper set, though.

It’s still a Mini and Minis make you smile. 8/10

Buy the LEGO Creator 42042 Mini Cooper set

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This is the Self Preservation Society…

Lego The Italian Job

This is the self-preservation society
The self-preservation society

Go wash your German bands, your boat race too
Comb your Barnet Fair we got a lot to do
Put on your Dickie Dirt and your Peckham Rye
Cause time’s soon hurrying by

Get your skates on mate, get your skates on mate
No bib around your Gregory Peck today, eh?
Drop your plates of meat right up on the seat

This is the self-preservation society
This is the self-preservation society…

Oh yeah, Miro Dudas has updated his previously blogged Mini Cooper to Italian Job spec! See more here!

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A Mini Mini

Mini Mini Cooper

LEGO’s 10242 Mini Cooper has already started to inspire builders to produce Mini MOCs. This example is from Miro Dudas, over on Flickr. It features a very neat solution to finding small parts suitable for the Mini’s distinctive headlights.

Film buffs that they are, the Elves were confused by LEGO’s Creator set including a nice picnic instead of a sewer and an Italian police car. Unfortunately they’ve now managed to jam Miro’s MOC down a small plastic pipe and we’re not sure how we’ll get it out to return it to him. “Hang on a minute lads, I’ve got a great idea…

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Creator 10242 Mini Cooper Preview

Lego 10242 Mini Cooper Review

Today is a Big News Day! After much secrecy we can reveal the newest addition to LEGO’s Expert Creator line; 10242 Mini Cooper!

Following on from the superb 10220 Volkswagen Camper, LEGO have turned their design expertise to one of the most loved, recognisable and famous cars ever produced, the wonderful original Mini. 10242 is based on a last-of-the-line 1998 Cooper in British Racing Green, complete with UK registration plates and a picnic in the boot! Over to LEGO’s press release for the full details:

Experience the iconic MINI Cooper first hand, with its classic lines, detailed interior and fun picnic theme.

Take the iconic MINI Cooper for a drive! This beautifully crafted LEGO® brick replica of the classic MINI Cooper Mk VII is full of authentic details, from the classic green and white color scheme with white wing mirrors and racing stripes, to the opening doors, hood and trunk, sporty fog lights, detailed engine and separate spare tire compartment. You can even remove the roof to access a tan colored interior with patterned seats, veneer-style dashboard, turning steering wheel, and moving gearshift and handbrake. And of course, no MINI Cooper would be complete without a picnic basket and blanket, the perfect accessories for a cozy day in the countryside!

• Features opening doors, hood and trunk, spare wheel in separate compartment, detailed engine and 2 fog lights.
• Accessories include a picnic basket, bottle and blanket for nostalgic picnic theme.
• Authentic replica of the MINI Cooper Mk VII.
• Classic green and white color theme with white wing mirrors and racing stripes.
• Lift the hood to reveal the detailed engine.
• Remove the roof and access the detailed interior.
• Go on a countryside picnic with this iconic classic!
• MINI Cooper measures over 4” (11cm) high, 9” (25cm) long and 5” (14cm) wide.

US $99.99 – CA $119.99 – AU $149.99 – DE 89.99€ – UK £74.99 – DK 799.00 DKK  *Euro pricing varies by country.

10242 will reach stores over the summer (or the next few months for those of you around the world), aimed at experienced builders and featuring over 1000 LEGO pieces. Hopefully we’ll see a few British Racing Green creations appearing shortly after release!

Lego 10242 Review

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